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Comics

Posted by on in Comics
No, that's not a complaint about the character on my part - that's the actual title of this story from June, 1972.


I've had several different Iron Man comics and storylines in mind to review on this blog, and I'll hopefully be getting to all of them at some point.  I went with this one, though, because it was the very first Iron Man comic I'd ever read.  I'd only previously known about him from the arcade game Captain America & The Avengers, and a couple of brief appearances in How To Draw Comics The Marvel Way.  I came across the trade paperback The Many Armors of Iron Man at a bookstore, reprinting various stories from the character's history.  This was the first story in said collection, and it became the first of many Iron Man stories I'd read and collect over the years.  (Iron Man's been a heavy-hitter of my comic collection for a number of years.)  So there's a bit of sentimentality on my part in picking this one before any of the others.

The creation of Iron Man is actually a pretty funny story (since this particular comic recaps the character's origins, I'm going to save that for when I summarize the plot).  Stan Lee deliberately tried to create a superhero that would represent everything the 1960s counter-culture movement opposed, but who would still be someone readers could like and sympathize with.  And thus we got Anthony Stark - playboy, scientist, inventor, munitions manufacturer for the United States military - and his armored alter-ego.  Iron Man made his debut in Tales of Suspense #39 (March, 1963), a science-fiction anthology series he would headline for a bit before sharing it with Captain America as of Tales of Suspense #59.  (Cap ended up taking over the magazine starting with Issue #100, while Iron Man got his own series in May 1968.)  In addition to his solo exploits, Iron Man was also a founding member and financier of The Avengers, Marvel's primary superhero team. 

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Posted by on in Comics

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Here's a tiny bit of hopeless self-promotion. 

I, Witney Seibold, just started up a new weekly comic strip that I wanted to share with the folks 'round these parts. It's called "Milo Multigrain," and it's a gentle comic strip for little kids. As yet, there are only three comics on the site, but there will be a new one every Sunday morning for at least the next six months. 

Go to MiloMultigrain.com to see more, leave comments, and let me know if I'm doing a good thing or a terrible thing. Actually, if you think I'm doing a terrible thing, keep it to yourself. 

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Something you'll occasionally see showing up in the media of comics are artists attempting to conclude their original work. With so many series being cycled between writers, handed from creator to creator or altered thanks to editorial decree, it's hardly surprising these crop up once in a while. Perhaps the reason they show up in comics the most is thanks to the degree of freedom available. After all, you don't need to spend time worrying about budgets as much as with film and television, the characters don't age and you can even evoke memories of a previous era by simply altering the art style.


Previous examples include the sadly short-lived X-Men Forever by Chris Claremont (which unfortunately ended with oh so many loose ends) and even George Lucas' original plans for Star Wars. Given just how often his saga styled plotlines were cut short, it's no real surprise Simon Furman returned with one last hurrah for the original Transformers comics.


Skipping Generation Two entirely, Regeneration One directly follows on from where the original Transformers comics left off, barring a slight time-skip. Set several decades after the Decepticons' apparently final defeat by the Last Autobot and Unicron's destruction, Cybertron is at peace. Under the rule of the Autobots, the world has been rebuilt and life flourishes once again. However, that peace is soon to be cut short. Under Soundwave, groups of disgruntled neo-Decepticons have been forming, ready to begin the Great War anew. Even as the first shots are fired, few realise just where this war will lead to, or what things are slowly awakening once more.

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Posted by on in Comics

Want info on the Starbolts? Click here: http://starbolts.blogspot.com/p/future-of-earths-heroes.html

Last time on Starbolts: Chaos ran through the streets as reporter Laura Fanjoy recounted the very public battle between the Starbolts and the Guardians! Heroes were fighting heroes. The Starbolts were left defeated! Elsewhere, on the pilfered ship called the Guardian, Kevin and Angela managed to lock the Guardians out of the ships controls! Sadly, they were captured by the mystic known as Madam Zarantha!

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Please proceed to the link below for the following review!

http://youtu.be/n1pPUjsHRt4

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Posted by on in Comics

Want info on the Starbolts? Click here: http://starbolts.blogspot.com/p/future-of-earths-heroes.html

Last time on Starbolts: Marcus laid defeated at the hands of Apollo and Velocity! Then along came a redhead from England who chewed him out good! Britannia's not one to mess with, kids. Anyway, Iron Eagle decided it would be a good idea to steal the Guardian, the Starbolts' spaceship. He does just that and shortly thereafter the large ship rises out of the city's harbor no doubt freaking people out. Smooth.

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Posted by on in Comics

Lila_Quintero_Weaver

Darkroom: A Memoir in Black and White is an autobiographical graphic novel written by Lila Quintero Weaver. It was published and is distributed by the University of Alabama Press.

Summary: The book serves as both an autobiography and as a brief second hand account of a tragic event that occurred in 1965 in Marion, Alabama. Lila Quintero moves from Argentina to Marion as a result of her father’s work as a religious figure and language academic. Much of the stories about her life have to do with how other races are treated and the stumbles her younger family members had while adapting to life in the United State’s bible belt. The Quinteros have a unique and privileged position for racial minorities in Marion, as most of the white locals are completely ignorant about the family’s origin and race, and thus, the family doesn’t experience much prejudice while in Marion, as they are for the most part written off as white. In 1965, Lila’s father witnesses a police-incited riot during a Southern Christian Leadership Conference march, which results in the injuries of several innocents and the death of Jimmie Lee Jackson. Much of Lila’s teen years are spent in the company of rights activists and anti-racists. Her academic aspirations escape her in her late teens and she marries young, but as an adult she returns to college and graduated from the same institution that I did for my undergrad, the University of Alabama’s New College.

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Posted by on in Comics

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I’m rather tired of these graphic novel adaptions of novels at this point. The Web was written by Jonathan Kellerman, adapted by Ande Parks, and lazily illustrated by Michael Gaydos. This shitty book is distributed by Random House.

Narrative: Some guy named Dr. Alex Delaware gets to go on a three-month island vacation by helping out an old fogey named Dr. Moreland search through a mountain of research at a leisurely pace. Alex brings along his pretty lamp of a girlfriend, who has a name, I think, but she mostly just has sex with him and bravely holds onto a tarantula despite being deathly afraid of hissing roaches. As one would expect would happen when invited to a tropical island for no reason, bad shit starts going down, people get into deadly accidents or killed, and tensions rise with a politician. Some other things happen but it’s mostly boring. Moving on.

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Posted by on in Comics

Want info on the Starbolts? Click here: http://starbolts.blogspot.com/p/future-of-earths-heroes.html

Last time on Starbolts: While Iron Eagle, the leader of the Guardians fought his way through Agents Embassy, Velocity challenged Marcus to a race that ended with him getting zapped by the Greek God Apollo. Humiliated, we turn now to moments just after the encounter.

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